Plant-milk versus dairy milk

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A story written by Leslie Beck in the Globe and Mail newspaper this week caught my attention. It’s about kids drinking plant-based milk over dairy milk. A big topic for many parents.

First of all, I’ll say that in my experience, goat’s milk is better tolerated than cow’s milk because of the protein structure. Cow’s milk comes from large animals with large protein structure.

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What’s a safe and clean formula milk for your baby?

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This is not a headline that any new parent wants to read:

“80% of infant formula contains arsenic, study finds”.

With byline of:

One third of baby food products tested also contained lead”.

It’s enough to read if your baby is drinking formula milk that it likely contains arsenic, but then all the other baby products too. And lead? Sheesh. There have been concerns of arsenic in baby formula in the past, and all baby products containing rice, but not lead. Products that you’d think safe and trustworthy seem to have fallen to the low end of the safe list according to this article. That makes shopping for healthy products for your baby that much more difficult. If there’s something positive to come out of this, it might be that you go back to the kitchen to make your own food.

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Blast Past the Weight Loss Plateau

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Weight loss feels great when the numbers are heading consistently towards your goal. The scale going the wrong way can be disheartening and the scale not moving from week to week is downright frustrating. When you’re stuck and can’t seem to get past the plateau, here are some tips to try and get you moving towards your goal.

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Fermenting Series Week 3 – Kefir

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Kefir (proununced ke-fear) is a new-ish product found in the supermarket chiller cabinet near yogurt and other dairy products. It has been tucked in with butter and yogurt at most health food stores for years and actually dates to 1885 in Russia, way before refrigeration.

Adding kefir grains to milk is what produces kefir. The grains are composed of lactic acid bacteria, yeast and polysaccharides. The grains culture the milk, infusing it with healthy organisms or probiotics. The result is a tangy, slightly effervescent drink similar to yogurt. Kefir “grains” have nothing to do with grain, and typically look like small pieces of cauliflower and vary in size from a grain of rice to an almond.

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